How The Sun Affects Temperatures On Earth

  • Date: 06/10/19
  • Conversations That Matter, with Stuart McNish

An interview with Professor Valentina Zharkova on the affect of solar activity on terrestrial climate

The sun is going through a stage known as a solar or Maunder Minimum.

This is where the solar activity that ignites solar flares or sun spots has decreased. It’s a normal cycle and one that has been linked to the mini ice age that lasted more than 50 years starting in the mid-1600s.

According to space weather since 2015, the number of days without a recordable sun spot has been rising year over year. NOAA, NASA and others all appear to agree the sun is entering a solar minimum phase.

What it means is open to interpretation because as Professor William Happer pointed out when I asked him about the growing number of people and agencies that suggest a solar minimum could lead to a cooling off period, he directed me the Danish proverb: “It is difficult to make predictions, especially about the future.”

It has been suggested that mathematics can establish patterns and back them up with empirical evidence to support a prediction. We reached out to Professor of Mathematics Valentina Zharkova of Northumbria University, one of the first people to raise awareness of the decrease in solar activity, for a Conversation That Matters about the sun, its reduced activity and her reading of the impact it will have on temperatures on earth.

Watch full interview

see also Professor Valentina Zharkova’s GWPF talk: The Solar Magnet Field and the Terrestrial Climate

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