Five Reasons Blog Posts Are Of Higher Scientific Quality Than Journal Articles

  • Date: 16/04/17
  • Daniel Lakens, The 20% Statistician

In this blog, I will examine the hypothesis that blogs are, on average, of higher quality than journal articles. Below, I present 5 arguments in favor of this hypothesis.

1. Blogs have Open Data, Code, and Materials

When you want to evaluate scientific claims, you need access to the raw data, the code, and the materials. Most journals do not (yet) require authors to make their data publicly available (whenever possible). The worst case example when it comes to data sharing is the American Psychological Association. In the ‘Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct’ of this professional organization that supported torture, point 8.14 says that psychologists only have to share data when asked to by ‘competent professionals’ for the goal to ‘verify claims’, and that these researchers can charge money to compensate any costs that are made when they have to respond to a request for data. Despite empirical proof that most scientists do not share their data when asked, the APA considers this ‘ethical conduct’. It is not. It’s an insult to science. But it’s the standard that many relatively low quality scientific journals, such as the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, hide behind to practice closed science.

On blogs, the norm is to provide access to the underlying data, code, and materials. For example, here is Hanne Watkins, who uses data she collected to answer some questions about the attitudes of early career researchers and researchers with tenure towards replications. She links to the data and materials, which are all available on the OSF. Most blogs on statistics will link to the underlying code, such as this blog by Will Gervais on whether you should run well-powered studies or many small-powered studies. On average, it seems to me almost all blogs practice open science to a much higher extent than scientific journals.

2. Blogs have Open Peer Review

Scientific journal articles use peer review as quality control. The quality of the peer review process is as high as the quality of the peers that were involved in the review process. The peer review process was as biased as the biases of the peers that were involved in the review process. For most scientific journal articles, I can not see who reviewed a paper, or check the quality, or the presence of bias, because the reviews are not open. Some of the highest quality journals in science, such as PeerJ and Royal Society Open Science, have Open Peer Review, and journals like Frontiers at least specify the names of the reviewers of a publication. Most low quality journals (e.g., Science, Nature) have 100% closed peer review, and we don’t even know the name the handling editor of a publication. It is often impossible to know whether articles were peer reviewed to begin with, and what the quality of the peer review process was.

Some blogs have Open pre-publication Peer Review. If you read the latest DataColada blog post, you can see the two reviews of the post by experts in the field (Tom Stanley and Joe Hilgard) and several other people who shared thoughts before the post went online. On my blog, I sometimes ask people for feedback before I put a blog post online (and these people are thanked in the blog if they provided feedback), but I also have a comment section. This allows people to point out errors and add comments, and you can see how much support or criticism a blog has received. For example, in this blog on why omega squared is a better effect size to use than eta-squared, you can see why Casper Albers disagreed by following a link to a blog post he wrote in response. Overall, the peer review process in blog posts is much more transparent. If you see no comments on a blog post, you have the same information about the quality of the peer review process as you’d have for the average Science article. Sure, you may have subjective priors about the quality of the review process at Science (ranging from ‘you get in if your friend is an editor’ to ‘it’s very rigorous’) but you don’t have any data. But if a blog has comments, at least you can see what peers thought about a blog post, giving you some data, and often very important insights and alternative viewpoints.

3. Blogs have no Eminence Filter

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4. Blogs have Better Error Correction

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5. Blogs are Open Access (and might be read more).

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