Poor Countries Walk Out on Climate Talks

  • Date: 14/12/09

Voice of America: Developing nations have thrown U.N.-sponsored talks on climate change into disarray.

Representatives from some of the world’s poorer countries walked out on negotiations Monday in Copenhagen, angered by weakening support for a key treaty to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Developing nations, including many African nations, want to extend the Kyoto Protocol – the only treaty that currently commits industrialized nations to reduce emissions blamed for global warming.  But that approach does not have the support of rich countries.

Industrialized nations say Kyoto does not include the United States, China or developing nations.

Developing nations have threatened they will not return to talks until the dispute is resolved.

The protest comes as the talks enter their second and final week, and some leaders warned the effort might fail.

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Climate negotiations ‘suspended’

BBC News: Negotiations at the UN climate summit have been suspended after the African group withdrew co-operation. African delegations were angry at what they saw as moves by the Danish host government to sideline talks on more emission cuts under the Kyoto Protocol.

As news spread around the conference centre, about 200 activists responded with chants of “We stand with Africa – Kyoto targets now”.

It is unclear how matters will proceed now, though informal talks are likely.

Blocs representing poor countries vulnerable to climate change have been adamant that rich nations must commit to emission cuts beyond 2012 under the Kyoto Protocol.

But the EU and the developed world in general has promoted the idea of a new agreement. Developing countries fear they would lose many of the gains they made when the protocol was agreed in 1997.

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