• Frozen To Death: Too Much Sea Ice & Temperature Drop Causes Antarctic Penguin Disaster

    • Date: 13/10/17
    • The Daily Telegraph

    A colony of more than 36,000 Adelie penguins in Antarctica suffered a catastrophic breeding season with just two chicks surviving, experts have said. Extensive sea ice and a drop in temperature caused chicks to freeze to death. The disaster for the colony in Terre Adelie in East Antarctica was down to unusually extensive sea ice late in […]

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  • October Arctic Surprise: Rapid Recovery Of Ice Extent

    • Date: 09/10/17
    • Ron Clutz, Science Matters

    In recent years, October has seen some rapid recoveries of Arctic ice extents.  But this year may become something special. With the early onset of Siberian snow cover and the resulting surface cooling, ice is roaring back, especially on the Asian side. Consider the refreezing during the last 11 days through yesterday. The graph compares […]

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  • Will La Nina Bring Down Global Temperatures To Pre-El Nino Levels?

    • Date: 04/10/17
    • Paul Dorian, Vencore, Inc.

    If history is any guide, once La Nina becomes well-established in the tropical Pacific Ocean, global temperatures should drop noticeably relative-to-normal.   Oceanic Niño Index (ONI), October 2017 Overview Earlier this year, there were signs that a weak El Nino in the tropical Pacific Ocean could continue through the fall and even into the upcoming […]

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  • Arctic Sea Ice Remarkably Stable Since 2007

    • Date: 02/10/17
    • Ron Clutz, Science Matters

    Arctic ice extent has been fairly stable since 2007 and is now 500.000 square kilometres (193,000 sq miles)  higher than 10 years ago. September daily extents are now fully reported and the 2017 September monthly results can be compared with years of the previous decade.  MASIE showed 2017 exceeded 4.8M km2  and SII was close […]

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  • Climate Scientists Shoot The Messenger

    • Date: 25/09/17
    • Dr David Whitehouse, GWPF Science Editor

    Blaming the news media is another low for climate science.  Journalists reported accurately that climate models have been running hot — because that’s what climate scientists actually told the press, and there was nothing wrong with the headlines.   Monday 18th September was to be an especially busy day for some scientists. Many were arriving in Oxford […]

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  • Climate Change Will Take Longer, Say Scientists

    • Date: 19/09/17
    • Dr David Whitehouse, GWPF Science Editor

    A new paper written by scientists from six nations says that the slowdown in global temperatures in the early 20th century means that global warming will take longer than the IPCC predicted.   It has resulted in such headlines as that in the Times; We were wrong — worst effects of climate change can be avoided, […]

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  • La Niña May Develop By Fall or Winter, NOAA Says

    • Date: 15/09/17
    • The Weather Channel

    La Niña is now increasingly possible in the next few months, according to a new report released by NOAA. La Niña/El Niño, the periodic cooling/warming of the equatorial eastern and central Pacific Ocean, can shift weather patterns over a period of months, bringing the possibility of more sustained warm, cold, wet or dry weather in parts of the […]

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  • IPCC Scenarios Refuted By Reality: Global CO2 Emissions Intensity Increasing, Not Declining

    • Date: 13/09/17
    • Felix Pretis and Max Roser, Energy

    New study reveals that global CO2 emissions intensity growth exceeded 37 of all 39 IPCC scenarios – including all 6 main scenarios – over the decade 2000–2010.    Panel b shows observed annual growth rates together with observed decadal growth rates over both decades. Observed decadal growth rates exceed all main scenario projections over the […]

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